Gradient Mode (Chroma)

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    Joe Bruno

    Can we get more info/examples here? If I wanted to create a smooth gradient where there were less noticeable bands of single colors, what would the numbers look like? You guys had a yellow and blue vase that looked like there was some green in it. How was that made? 

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    Jonny Yeu

    Hey Joe, the smoothness of your gradient pattern would depend on the total length of your print and the difference between the min and max values. Longer prints enable you to create a larger distance between the two, and the bigger the gap between the min and max, the smoother the gradient. 

    The blending of the yellow and blue can cause bleed in the model as transitions between the color actually occur in the model. This is what is causing the green effect.

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    Simon Young

    will this feature be made available in Canvas ?

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    Jonny Yeu

    Hey Simon, we built Gradient mode directly into Palette 2 (http://mm3d.co/p2gradient) and do plan to build it into CANVAS in the future.

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    Mike C (mc_ott)

    Jonny Yeu, I use Octoprint to connect to my Palette 2S Pro. Is it possible to use  "Vase mode" in Canvas3d.io without a Transition Tower, basically like the Gradient mode in Chroma?

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    Jonny Yeu

    Mike C (mc_ott) Currently, there's no way to turn off a tower within CANVAS, but if you're looking to complete a Gradient print with a Palette 2S Pro, it is built into the actual unit: http://mm3d.co/p2gradient

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    Thomas Wilcox

    I really enjoy gradient mode on my Pallet 2S (just upgraded to S a few weeks ago) I have made a lot of really nice prints using it. Sometimes I will just use for a more uniform incremental alternating colors instead of making a long custom pattern or a random mode. Just to get the look without going full gradient and ending at a different color. I do use Chroma from time to time, I like the ability to set a long starting length without automatically adding it to the end. 

    The only part that confuses me, and it may (probably) be my math, is the MIN/MAX lengths. Your Blue/Red example, that was with MIN-100 and MAX-800? The example is given by Adalyn in the Pallet2 section I really like as well, but those seem to have been very small values for min and max. 

    When you have entered the settings, does it generate the gradient lengths based within the confines given for total filament used? Where Start/end allocate (x) amount of the total filament and the remainder is divided up between your MIN/MAX settings?

     

    Sorry, sounded like a much more.....condensed question in my head. :)

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    Jonny Yeu

    Hey Thomas, no need to apologize, we're really glad that you enjoy printing in Gradient mode. To be honest with you, I'm not too sure if the picture lines up with the example values that we provide in this article, it's been a while since we first published this! However, you would be correct that it would create gradient lengths within the provided confines. Using your example, the red filament would start with the minimum length of 100 mm, and aim to finish at 800 mm with incremental increases along the way. The opposite is true for blue, where it will start at 800 mm and reduce incrementally until it hits 100 mm. Essentially, each color change is a ratio of the total 900 mm per transition, and this is used with the total filament length of the model to create the gradient effect.

     

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